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place. for seven years i have given 100% of my time, energy, and life to public service. however over the past several months, as my health hasdi tieror ated, my ability to serve the constituents of my district has continued to anyonish. against the recommendations of my doctors, i had hoped and tried to return to washington and continue working on the issues that matter most to the people of the second district. i now know that will not be possible. the constituents of the second district deserve a full-time legislator in washington, something i cannot be for the foreseeable future. my health issues and treatment regimen have become incompatible with service in the house of representatives. therefore it is with great regret that i hereby resign as a member of the united states house of representatives, effective today, in order to focus on restoring my health. during this journey, i have made my share of mistakes. i am aware of the ongoing federal investigation into my activities and am doing my best to address the situation respovensably, cooperate with the investigators and accept
of defense has invested significant time and resources into improving our nation's energy security. energy security is imperative to the success of today's military. which, by the way, uses 93% of the energy that's used by the federal government, which is the largest user of energy in this country. as our current chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general dempsey, has said, without improving our energy security we are not merely standing still as a nation, we are falling behind. let's be clear. energy security is national security. and our military leadership understands this. other countries, including some of our strongest competitors, also understand this and we ignore this fact at our own peril. i saw some of the innovations that the navy has adopted earlier this year when i chaired a hearing for the energy subcommittee on water and power down in norfolk aboard the uss kersarge. the purpose was to highlight the advancements the navy continues to make in harnessing renewable energy resources. up with of those resources i saw is homegrown -- homegrown biofuels. and the navy recently
, energy and the navy signed a memorandum of understanding to invest $170 million each to spur the production of advanced aviation and marine biofuels under the defense production act. this joint memorandum of understanding requires substantial cost sharing from private industry of at least a one-to-one match. the main objective of this memorandum of understanding is to spur the construction or retrofit of commercial scale advanced biofuel refineries. these facilities will produce drop-in advanced biofuels meeting military specifications. they will be located at geographically diverse locations for ready market access and will have no significant impact on the supply of agricultural commodities for the production of food. it's the largest single consumer of fuel in the world, the department of defense uses approximately 120 million barrels of oil each year, spending over $17 billion in fiscal year 2011 on fuel. this dependency on a single source of energy leaves our military's readiness at risk. when the price of oil goes up $1, it costs the navy an additional $30 million, and
as to whether there would be a challenge for that. we observed that the rise and shine has more energy needs for more energy than they can produce themselves, and to maintain the economic growth which they believe is essential. we observed that the south china sea is a potential source of energy supplies for china and that there is a contention among the nations in that region as to where the ownership and rights of access are to the south china sea. and this is conceivable that china might seek to reestablish its claim there by military coercion and that could lead them into a confrontation with the united states' desire to maintain free access. the best way of avoiding that military conflict is what we should see because the military conflict with china would be catastrophic for both nations, indeed for the whole region. so, we want to avoid that. i believe the best way of avoiding that is by maintaining a -- continuing to maintain a strong naval presence in the region, and by having an unambiguous commitment to doing that. i believe that our new national security strategy is that unambigu
. oel kline, get rid of the department of energy. one government, 100,000 kids in arizona will now have $5,000 voucher, public school or private school or home school. if they don't spend it -- you don't need more money. given the post office, your letters arrive sooner or would allow fedex or ups to deliver mail to make the post office mail different. >> we are really getting that. one more question. when you leave here very shortly, you go to a wednesday meeting, a liberal meeting of the right wing -- this is a weekly meeting you have had -- >> some of the people are from there. >> this is a weekly meeting of what you call a center-right coalition. you have several meetings, 60 of them around the country. this is a place where congress, people from think takes toward generally agree get together, 150 people, sometimes 20 of them will speak. what you going to tell them? what is your message? >> the reason people come to my meeting is i don't tell me things. if i talk, everybody gets -- 33 people attempt and we will overtime be candid. field kinks and activist groups, running the republ
at rice university. >> on tomorrow morning's "washington journal", gas prices and alternative energy efforts. long-term unemployment benefits and why they may end in january without congressional action is discussed. after that, dominic chu describes what wall street investors are doing with their money in excess of the fiscal cliff. close plus your e-mails and phone calls and tweets. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> you are watching c-span2 with politics and public affairs. weekdays featuring live coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights, watch key public policy events, and every weekend, the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedules on the website and join in the the conversation on social media sites. >> representatives met in nova scotia earlier this month before the house. this is one hour and 15 minutes. >> welcome back, everybody. i would like to hand over to the dominical steve clemons, who is moderating the session. >> thank you so much. it's great to be with all of you. we have a fantasti
of over 300 million people, the american society of civil energies put the quality of you are infrastructure as a d, when we're ranked 24th in overall quality in the world when in 2001 we were number two, we're going to spend less than $53 billion. that's not only weak, it's pathetically weak. mr. garamendi: mr. higgins, thank you so very, very much for bringing this issue in stark terms to our attention. you caught me my attention earlier when we were talking about this, but here on the floor, this is a $1,200 billion program that could create 27 million jobs in the next five years? and those are economic analysis that's been done by the new america foundation? mr. higgins: it has. mr. garamendi: and how do we pay for this again? mr. higgins you spay for it as you pay for transportation improvements at the local, state and federal level. you issue debt to finance the life of the project. mr. gare men tee: the same way we build and own our homes, we borrow money to build that personal infrastructure, our home. mr. -- mr. higgins: that's right. mr. garamendi: the borrowing
. that means more than 40 percent of the chilean population. in terms of energy was released, you can see there it's one trillion kilograms of tnt, that means an 8.8 earthquake. another comparison could be 18,000 times the hiroshima atomic bomb. it's supposed it occur less than two a year above 8. chili has first runner up with 9.5 with bolivia, 10 minutes duration. this one was 8.8, at that moment was no. 4, then japan next year led next year with 8.9, but it's a lot, a big amount of energy was released in just 3 1/2 minutes. usually that things happen at night. i don't know why, but it always happen at night. so we are leading on february 27 at 3.24 and you can see in light blue the time when the first wave arrived the coast because the epicenter was so close to the coast. so it's no more than 10 minutes and at the same time the waves start moving through the pacific ocean and in 21 hours it hits the coast of hawaii. so everybody was affected because of that. in mexico, for instance, the variation of time was 1 1/2 meters. as you can see there, when that happened, 3.34, immediate
cable satellite corp. 2012] >> we are just getting back. the energy level is probably going to get mellow. we will make that work for us. today's panel is on the question of for-profit and federal education policy. this is a topic that we at aei have been talking about for an extended stretch. in support of the templeton foundation, we have been running the private enterprise projects, trying to think about the opportunities and the challenge. how do make this work for kids in the community's? how do we think about some of the challenges the potential perils? this panel is a close of a series of panels and conversations. we have commissioned a number of pieces that will be coming up as a book this spring. we have the opportunity to work. phones, inose of the was cell turn them off. why this topic? the vast majority of what we do in america k-12 is done by public institutions. it is done by institutions run by states. and a lot of other work including most charter schools are run by nonprofit. then there is a substantial slot of activity that is for profit. they run schools or colle
-hour energy pink lemonade and ♪ ♪ you can help others along the way. ♪ ♪ a portion of every bottle that they sell goes to fight ♪ ♪ breast cancer and i think that's swell. ♪ ♪ the more you take, the more they'll pay, ♪ ♪ so make them write a big check today. ♪ ♪ and if you're feeling a little slow, ♪ ♪ then 5-hour energy will help you go. ♪ ♪ so buy a bottle of pink lemonade and ♪ ♪ you can help fight breast cancer today. ♪ megyn: a new round of meetings and a new round of criticism in just the last hour over u.n. ambassador susan rice what she said about the consulate attack in libya and her possible nomination as our next secretary of state. miss rice meeting a short time ago with two top republican senators, kwopb o one of them, bob corker who is worried that ambassador rice is too political and not independent enough. he suggests the president needs to think twice here. >> i would just ask that the president step back away from all the buzz around this particular situation and take a deep breath and decide who is the best secretary of state for our
in their community in a positive way, what happened was they were able to refocus a lot of that mental energy not on the past but on the future. and as they started to do that, they found ways to process what had happened. and we see the manifestation of some of the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder actually go down over time. i think the third and final thing we need to do for young men and women who have come home are facing this is to let them know that this is normal. it is an absolutely normal thing to have an abnormal reaction to an abnormal situation. a situation of extraordinary and violent and difficult and hardship, and is normal to come back and do not want is somebody stand behind you, do not want to be sitting at a restaurant in the middle of lots of people. that's a normal reaction to one of the things we have to do when people come back is to make sure that they now they, this is a normal and natural place, and let them know that there are many people who have been able and found ways to work through this. so we have to give them hope by letting them know this is norma
. mike is an alameda and he is getting some energy before he goes shopping. >> a couple of people are starting to filter and at jim's coffee shop. today marks the third annual small business saturday. if consumers are encouraged to shop loco and help small businesses. this falls between black friday and cyber monday. many large retail stores see a lot of business and those with smaller businesses like this one encourages people to remember them as well. >> i think it is important for you to support your neighbor and basically these people that own these areas are our neighbors. we may not know the ceo of wal-mart or denny's and we may not know that they are our neighbors. >> small-business saturday takes place nationwide and this is across the bay area. if you do need an extra incentive to come out they are offering 3 m parking every day now until christmas weekend. >> there was one incident during black friday at stone town galleria in san francisco. police say the thieves were doing their own shopping in the parking lot of them all. kron4 is a j.r. stone reports electronics are
is they were able to refocus a lot of their mental energy on the past but on the future. as they started to do that, they found ways to process what had happened. and we saw a manifestation of some of the symptoms go down over time. i think the third and final thing that we need to do is to let men and women know that this is normal. it is a normal thing to have an abnormal reaction to an abnormal situation. in a situation of difficulty and violence, it is hard to come back and not want to have someone stand behind you and sit in a restaurant in the middle of things. one of the things we have to do is make sure that people know they are in a normal and natural place and let them know that there are many people who have been able to and found ways to work through them. we have to help them know that this is normal and that people have done this successfully. if we can do all of that, keep people connected, let them know there is a sense of purpose and they are all right where they are at, then we find that a lot of people, even those with extreme cases, they can beat the condition and lead fulf
talked about on cbs, nbc, cnn, or any of the networks. he just announced that he can do an energy tax tomorrow and not have broken his word. an energy tax, wacking the middle class. he could raise income taxes on people a year from now. which is why what he wanted to do is kick out the bush rates for those making less $250,000 a year. this is where you talk about the dual mandate. we are talking about marginal tax rates, higher income people and successful small businesses. that raises $400 billion -- there are other taxes, in addition to the rate increases he wants to include. over a decade. he has $800 billion he plans to raise from higher income people. the size of the debt -- if he gets that, in his budget, assuming he gets the tax hike -- he raises $8 trillion in debt over the next decade. having solved less than 10% of the problem, he then comes back and says, now, who is going to pay the $8 trillion? that is the energy tax. which, of course, the treasury department -- carbon in e-mails several thousand -- are the typing it out on carbon paper? you cannot turn the united states
of the department of education, get rid of the department of energy or whatever. no, reform government so it costs less. 100,000 kids in arizona will now have a $5,000 voucher, they can take to a public school, a private school, a parochial school, home school, if they don't spend it -- >> so you're saying -- >> you don't need more money, you need reforms. we've given the post office -- would allowing fedex and u.p.s. to deliver mail make your post office mail get their sooner? >> this is one of the questions on the card. when you leave here very shortly you're going to go to your wednesday meeting. this is a literal meeting of the right wing conspiracy, right? >> about this size. >> this is a weekly meeting that you've had -- >> some of the people from there are here. [laughter] i see you. >> so this is a weekly meeting of what you call the center right coalition. you have similar meetings, 60 of them, in 48 states, around the country. and this is a place where members of congress, people from think tanks, people who generally agree get together to kind of open mike, there's 150 people, sometimes
passed a comprehensive energy plan off the floor of this house. protected social security, advanced so many other issues. a in my opinion, tip o'neill was the elder -- was the albert einstein of politics. he knew what it took in order to make this institution work. he knew what it took to reach across the aisle, to find people of good will, to make this chamber work and to advance the agenda for this country. so for for me, it's a great honor to be here because buildings, as we name them, also embody that person. it is my hope that as people walk in and out of this building for the 21st century, that they think about who tip o'neill was. they think about, yes, how much he loved political war, but at the same time he brought his own personal warmth to that, that it was not separated here on the house floor. it is my hope in naming this building perhaps this process this great institution, can be an nated by his great legacy and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from california reserves his time. >> mr. speaker, i reser
? thousands and thousands of workers are building that. or when you redo bls to make them energy efficient, there's endless amount of workers. when angela merkel came over from germany and asked how did you improve your unemployment rate that quickly, she said, "we immediately made a decision to weatherize all the homes in germany." that's energy efficient but also put the employment -- unemployment rate back down to 5%. there is a relationship. >> i think maybe people thought "the inconvenient truth" was like that movie or "avatar." do you think there is a big environmental movie that needs to change people's minds? >> i think incon convenient truth was a terrific movie but it is screaming loud for a sequel. it exposed the problem but that's -- has not ever told us what is the solution. that's the next step i think people are waiting for. avenue abtar or inconvenient truth or many other films, i think they're very good because no matter how you put it, whether you are on the left or the right, as eff said many times, people breathing if you are republican air or democratic air. people jus
am not a spy. >> if you were, you could not tell us. >> we spend a lot of time and energy making sure facebook is available. we spend a ton of time on infrastructure and hiring people to make sure that you can get to that news feed. when it comes to governments that shut the internet off, that -- there is not a lot we can do. it is interesting that young people -- i had a friend who spent time in iran wanting young people use technology. one of the things he observed is the way he put it is the average 18-year-old knows every last detail of how bluetooth works on their phone, all the internet and facebook, the ins and outs of twitter, how to change your -- and the setting so someone can message you. every last detail their understood. when he asked them to are you afraid of the government finding it, they would say they do not understand how this stuff works. it was a message that -- in places where people do need an outlet or way of communicating that is not necessarily available in the public domain. it is a completely different animal. >> we have written about this issue on the sec
are a government and you are trying to avoid your national security grid or your energy grid getting hacked, how does that work? guest: the average joe is at his house. i meant to the guy who hacked facebook and stole 100 million passwords. i saw the list of the first million. they were literally all the same. people are still using "password 1234." that is 16 right there. that would eliminate 33% of all of the cyber hacking. let's say you run a medium-size business. i think you need to do training on social engineering vulnerabilities and how people need to be protected. you need hardware and fire walls and things like that. when you get into major corporations, some kind of attack would have tectonic effect. now you need to not just apply the a training -- the training on humans, but you need to ensure public-private partnerships. we need the help of the private sector. the private-sector needs to help the government. this problem is not something that is uniquely government or uniquely private. host: a viewer on twitter says companies give citizens private information to government and milita
engel is a member of the energy and commerce committee and recently wrote a letter to fred upton, the chairman of the commerce committee, hoping to hold hearings on telecommunications and sandy. representative engel, what's your goal with those hearings? >> guest: well, you know, my district, as most districts in the new york, were disrupted by hurricane sandy. and when we look at the disruption, it's clear that telecommunications services were one of the key services that failed to perform. and so, um, we want to have a hearing just to find out what went wrong and what we can do to insure in the future that the same thing doesn't happen again. the fcc reported that the storm knocked out a quarter of the cell towers in an area spreading across ten states, and people lost wireless, it's, -- television, telephone and internet services. and, obviously, it puts lives at risk, and it's clear there either wasn't correct preparation, or we were caught by surprise. so this is not something that we want to happen again. the purpose of this hearing would not be to point any fingers, it wou
american-made energy. but we've got to be careful how we get it. design the wells to be safe. thousands of jobs. use the most advanced technology to protect our water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ five days later, i had a massive heart attack. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ woman ] learn from my story. [ male announcer ] the way it moves. the way it cleans. everything about the oral-b power brush is simply revolutionary. oral-b power brushes oscillate, rotate and even pulsate to gently loosen and break up that sticky plaque with more brush movements than manual brushes and even up to 50% more than leading sonic technology brushes for a superior clean. oral-b power brushes. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. >>> some of the secrets surrounding osama bin laden's burial at sea are being revealed, and sensitive navy e-mails
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

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